preloader
Reserve your table
  1. Home
  2. Blog
  3. The Year of Raphael

The Year of Raphael

May 10, 2020
Italian Art

Italy and the rest of the art world was geared to commemorate Raphael’s 500th death anniversary in April 2020. However, due to the global pandemic, all celebrations, which consisted largely of exhibitions displaying his magnificent masterpieces, along the artwork of various artists that drew styles and influences from Raphael, were put on hold, as the world focused on healing itself from the virus.

We hope everyone continues to practise safe hygiene and take extra precautionary measures when travelling and moving around, whether you’re in Sri Lanka or halfway across the world. As we all stay safe at home, here’s our little commemoration to the great works of Raphael.

The Rise and Fall of Raphael

Raffaello Sanzio, commonly known as Raphael is one of Italy’s most celebrated artists of the High Renaissance style. He was born on April 6th, 1483 and died on April 6th 1520, at the age of 37. The early demise of his parents left Raphael an orphan at 11 years old. He studied art under the artist Perugino, where he earned his way into the service of Duke Federico de Montefeltro (with whom his father also worked for).

In 1504, Raphael’s ambition led him to Florence, where 29-year-old Michelangelo Buonarotti had just unveiled David to the Florentines and, Leonardo da Vinci, in his 50s completed the Mona Lisa.

Raphael continued to work on his masterpieces and even extended his skill into architecture. He spent the last decade of his life in Rome where he succumbed to a fatal illness. Italy mourned the loss of one of the greatest artists and gave him an elaborate funeral in his honour. His tomb remains inside Rome’s Pantheon till this day.

Renaissance Art

 

Raffaello was known as the indisputable genius of the Renaissance art. Artists from around the world have adapted this style into various works of art, from paintings and etchings to sculptures and more. Walter Valentini for example, had worked elements of this style into his famous etchings, with most of his artwork displaying features of the Renaissance utopia of the ‘Ideal City’, like the stylised archways, incomplete geometrical patterns and more.

Do you want to know more about authentic Italian cuisine, best wine pairings and secret offers at AQUA Forte? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and stay up to-date!

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

 

 

Our main dining hall at AQUA Forte is adorned with a series of etchings by Valentini, known as Misura Aurea; which draws inspiration from Raphael’s ‘Incendio di Borgo’, a painting located in the Vatican. The ‘Incendio di Borgo’ which translates to ‘The Fire in the Borgo’ was part of Raphael’s commission to decorate certain rooms of the Vatican, known as the ‘Stanze di Raffaeello’. Read more about Walter Valentini and his great work on display at AQUA Forte here.

Did You Know ?

We’re open once again, for dining, under special government regulations and measures. Call us now to reserve your table and enjoy a scrumptious Italian dining experience.

Do you want to know more about authentic Italian cuisine, best wine pairings and secret offers at AQUA Forte? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and stay up to-date!

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent Posts

categories

Archives